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Provisional Rules of Procedure

1. Article 30 of the Charter stipulates that the Security Council shall adopt its own rules of procedure, and in 1946, the Council adopted its Provisional Rules of Procedure (S/96). S/96/Rev.7

Terms Used in Resolutions

1. Common terms used in resolutions in English and French.

Annotated Examples of Points of Order and Rules of Procedure from Actual GA Meetings

No-action motions

1. General Assembly, Sixty-first session, Third Committee – Summary record of the 49th meeting, (pages 5-6) A/C.3/61/SR.49

In the context of promotion and protection of human rights, this summary record offers a good example of a point of order to move for the adjournment of debate which is sometimes referred to as the no-action motion.  When this occurs, the Chair gives the floor to two delegations that are in favour and two delegations that oppose this motion.

2.  General Assembly, Sixty-third session, 71st plenary meeting, (pages 3-5) A/63/PV.71

Example of a point of order to invoke a no-action motion.

3. General Assembly, Fifty-third session, First Committee, 29th meeting, (pages 14-16), A/C.1/53/PV.29

Includes an example of a no-action motion on a draft amendment that is carried. (See section on right of reply below for a different example in the same PV).

4, General Assembly, Sixty-first session, 81st plenary meeting, (pages 29-31), A/61/PV.81

Examples of the use of the no-action motion in Third Committee that deals with human rights issues.  The use of this procedural device in both the Committee and Plenary meetings are referred to. Usually, this motion occurs in one or the other, but in this instance, it is invoked in both.

5. General Assembly, Sixty-first session, 50th plenary meeting, (pages 18-20), A/61/PV.50

Example of a no-action motion on an amendment that was adopted.

6. General Assembly, Sixty-third session, 71st plenary meeting, (pages 3-7), A/63/PV.71

Another example of a point of order to make a no-action motion in the GA plenary as well as  a point of order to introduce oral amendments.

Right of Reply

1. General Assembly, Fifty-third session, First Committee, 29th meeting (page 6), A/C.1/53/PV.29

Good example of the right of reply, when it is allowed and how a request to reply gets communicated. (See section on no-action motion above for a different example in the same PV).

2. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, Third Committee – Summary record of the 44th meeting, (page 3), A/C.3/66/SR.44

An example of a reply by one delegate to a remark made by another delegate while an explanation of votes is in process.

Miscellaneous uses of a point of order

1. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, First Committee, 11th meeting, (page 19) A/C.1/66/PV.11

Example of a point order to correct the way aMemberStateis referred to by name.

2. General Assembly, Sixty-fifth session, 60th plenary meeting, (page 39), A/65/PV.60

Excellent example of a point of order requesting the Chair to be flexible on the rule of procedure that does not allow sponsors to explain their position.

3. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, 38th plenary meeting, (page 4), A/66/PV.38

An example of how the Chair handles competing points of order from Member States.

4. General Assembly, Sixty-seventh session, 27th plenary meeting, (page 2), A/67/PV.27

Includes a good example of the difference between a statement and a point of order.

5. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, First Committee, 22nd meeting, (page 28), A/C.1/66/PV.22

Interesting example of point order on a request for a vote that was not received by the Secretary of a Committee.

6. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, First Committee, 23rd meeting, (page 37-38), A/C.1/66/PV.23

Excellent example which highlights the difference between a traditional practice and a rule of procedure.

Oral revision of a draft resolution

1. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, First Committee, 23rd meeting, (page 5), A/C.1/66/PV.23

Example of a draft resolution being revised orally during a formal meeting. (See section on Miscellaneous points of order for different example in this PV).

Examples of draft resolutions and their revised versions after informal consultations

1. General Assembly, Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, A/C.3/67/L.44 ; Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, A/C.3/67/L.44/Rev.1

2. General Assembly, Sixty-fifth session, Fourth Committee, A/C.4/65/L.2; Sixty-fifth session, Fourth Committee, A/C.4/65/L.2/Rev.1

Examples of amendments to revised draft resolutions

1. General Assembly, Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, Agenda item 69 (b),  A/C.3/67/L.62; Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, Agenda item 69  (b),  A/C.3/67/L.63; Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, Agenda item 69 (b), A/C.3/67/L.64; Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, Agenda item 69 (b),  A/C.3/67/L.65; Sixty-seventh session, Third Committee, Agenda item 69 (b),  A/C.3/67/L.66;

Examples of amendments to the revised draft resolution tabled by individual Member States that did not agree with the revised draft.

Programme Budget Implications (PBI)

1. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, Third Committee, Summary record of the 49th meeting, (page 11), A/C.3/66/SR.49

Good example of a statement on the programme budget implications  that is required before taking action on a draft resolution.

How rules apply in Committee meetings vs. plenary meetings

1. General Assembly, 63rd  plenary meeting, (pages 3-5, 31), A/63/PV.61

Excellent  explanation of how deliberations in Committees relate to deliberations in Plenary meetings.  Also clarifies explanation of vote in Committees and Plenary meetings and that sponsors cannot be added in a plenary meeting.

Updating co-sponsor list

1. General Assembly, Sixty-fifth session, 76th plenary meeting, (page 5), A/65/PV.76

Example of when the list of co-sponsors of a draft resolution is updated before action is taken on a draft resolution.

2. General Assembly, Sixty-sixth session, Third Committee – Summary record of the 44th meeting (page 3) A/C.3/66/SR.44

Good example of the last chance given to Member States to consider sponsoring a draft resolution just before action is taken (see section on right of reply above for a different example in the same PV).

Language used by Chair to manage action phase

1. General Assembly, Sixty-fifth session, 88th plenary meeting, (page 2-6, -10), A/65/PV.88

This verbatim record offers an excellent example of the role of informal consultations,

It also includes language used by the Chair to initiate action on draft resolution, to adopt a resolution by consensus, to give the floor to a delegation wishing to make a statement following the adoption of a resolution by consensus, how to conclude deliberation on an agenda item, how to introduce a new resolution, the explanation of a vote before voting, the  introduction of an oral amendments before action is taken and then the explanation of a vote after voting.

Amendments

1. General Assembly, Fifty-ninth session, First Committee, 17th meeting , (pages 7-10), A/C.1/59/PV.17

Offers an excellent example of the use of written and oral amendments and what happens when a there is a difference of opinion over when written amendments are required. (See section on suspension of meetings  below for a different example in the same PV).

Suspension of meeting

1. General Assembly, Fifty-ninth session, First Committee, 17th meeting, (page 8-10), A/C.1/59/PV.17

Excellent example of when and why aMemberStatewould request a meeting to be suspended.

1. General Assembly, Fifty-ninth session, First Committee, 17th meeting, (page 1), A/C.1/59/PV.17

Offers a clear summary of the order in which general statements and explanations of vote are made: 1) general statements about a cluster of agenda items, 2) explanation of vote or position on draft resolutions in a cluster before action is taken, 3) then action is taken on all draft resolutions in a cluster without interruption of the voting process, and 4) finally an explanation of vote or position on all drafts within a cluster after action is taken.  (See section on amendments below for a different example in the same PV).

Vote requested on part of a draft resolution

1. General Assembly, Sixtieth session, First Committee, 20th meeting, (page 5), A/C.1/60/PV.20

Basic example of how a request to vote on a paragraph within a draft resolution takes precedence over taking action on the entire resolution.

Decision making power resides with the Member States

1. General Assembly, Sixty-fourth session, 8th plenary meeting, (pages 18-21), A/64/PV.8

Excellent example of an instance when the Chair’s ruling is appealed and overturned by a majority vote in the GA Plenary. Demonstrates that Member States can override the rulings of the presiding officer of a meeting and that the decision making power ultimately resides with Member States.

Interpretation of terms used in resolutions

1. General Assembly, Fifty-fifth session, (page 92), A/55/49 (Vol. III)

A Decision of the GA that affirms the meaning of “takes notes” and “notes” are neutral terms that  do not constitute approval or disapproval.

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